drugged driving

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The AAA Position: Marijuana’s Effect on Driving AAA, postition statement, statement, driving, drugged driving, Impairment, car crashes, Fatalities

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety analyzed cannabis use by drivers in one of those states, Washington, and found that the proportion of drivers involved in fatal crashes who had recently used marijuana more than doubled after Washington legalized the drug for recreational use. In addition, there’s currently no easy way to test whether a driver is impaired by marijuana: Unlike alcohol, it can’t be determined by breath or blood tests.

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"SWAP" TAC Drug Drive Ad driving, drugged driving, youtube, Fatalities

If you drive on drugs you are out of your mind.

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Stoned Drivers Are Killing More and More Innocent Victims drugged driving, driving, car crashes, Washington, Colorado, Fatalities

Fatal driving accidents have risen 122 percent between 2010 and 2014, according to the Washington State Traffic Safety Commission.

The science is clear and unambiguous—pot is a dangerous substance. It is not like alcohol at all. There is a reason it is classified as a Schedule I controlled dangerous substance, right along with heroin, LSD, and ecstasy. The American Medical Association, the American Lung Association, and other reputable doctors and scientists all reject legalization.

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Testing Drivers for Evidence of Marijuana Use is Difficult driving, drugged driving, drug testing

“It’s really difficult to document drugged driving in a relevant way, [because of] the simple fact that THC is fat soluble,” said Margaret Haney, a neurobiologist at Columbia University. “That makes it absorbed in a very different way and much more difficult to relate behavior to, say, [blood] levels of THC or develop a breathalyzer.”

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Why Is It So Hard To Test Whether Drivers Are Stoned? Potency, impaired, drugged driving, DUI

The simple fact that THC is fat soluble. That makes it absorbed in a very different way and much more difficult to relate behavior to, say, [blood] levels of THC or develop a breathalyzer."  The height of your intoxication isn't at the moment when blood THC levels peak, and the high doesn't rise and fall uniformly based on how much THC leaves and enters your bodily fluids, says Marilyn Huestis, who headed the chemistry and drug metabolism section at the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

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